Thursday, May 12, 2011

Raising Real Men, part 9

Ah, yes "KP Isn't Women's Work." I am a living witness of this truth. My wonderful husband does more cleaning in our kitchen than I do. I am so grateful for him, and I can't wait until our sons can take over that duty for him :) (Don't worry, I am training them already!!)

So how do we distinguish biblically between what women "should" do and what men "should" do as far as housework is concerned? (or more appropriately based on our topic, what should our boys be getting trained in?) In the Bible, men are seen doing the sewing, cooking, and taking care of children. (not that they were the ones in charge of these things, per se...but they certainly participated, and at times, took on the roles alone!)

Obviously, there are things women can do more easily if the husband is at work and the wife is at home with the children all day. The point, though, is to see that some of the roles we typically view as "women's work" is not necessarily so. We shouldn't be afraid to teach our boys some of the things that their wives might be taking charge of one day, because husbands can certainly take on those duties or at least help (not to mention the fact that OUR boys are living in a family of six...and they need to help care for the house we have been blessed with!!)

Here are some of the suggestions from the Young's:

When your son is helping cook in the kitchen, make a big deal about the fact that he is being the "head chef" for the day. Make a point to mention how he is helping to provide and care for his family. (and if he is going to wear an apron, by all means, make it manly ;) )

When you give your son chores around the house, talk about his "authority" over those certain areas (the fact that he is "in charge" of that role for the day/week/etc.)

Make sure you properly train your sons to do things the way you would like them done, and continue necessary supervision. (And certainly don't expect perfection. Encourage, praise, encourage, praise!!!)


"Our sons need to learn these tasks to take care of themselves when they leave our homes, and they need to understand them as a crucial part of the family's mission now." (p.194)

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